For Club and Country Southwell City 1914-18

Sam, Tom George, William some familiar names now as then, the boys that made up Southwell City Football Club in 1911. The team photo was to mark their win in the final of the Newark and District League Challenge Cup. None of them could have foreseen the events to follow, four years of War that would leave 16 million dead across the globe.

A Postmaster’s son, baker, lace maker, solicitor’s clerk, professional soldier and a silk worker from Maythorne a Century on it is known that, of those who served in WW1, almost half would be dead before the end of the conflict.

Some families would lose more than one son. Sam and Arthur Humberstone both played for the team and worked at Carey & Sons lace factory. Sam lived on Westgate with his wife and two young sons. Like most of the team the brother enlisted with the 1/8th Sherwood Foresters and would leave Southwell with the Battalion in August 1914. Both were promoted to Corporal whist in France. Sam was killed in action in June 1915 his younger brother Arthur two years later.

Several other members of the team worked at Carey & Sons and are remembered on the Memorial at the bottom of the Burgage, the former site of this factory.  These included Herbert Kirk the team’s striker of Burgage Lane and Edwin Gilbert both killed in action in France in the third year of the war. The Gilbert family would also suffer the loss of Edwin’s younger brother Jack who, having survived 4 years on the battlefields of France, died of his wounds just a week before the end of the war in November 1918.

The team’s goalkeeper John Watson formally of Sheppards Row and employee of the Southwell Co-op store would also be killed in action and is buried in France along with many of his comrades.

Whilst we tend to remember those who died we should not forget those of the team who returned home many wounded and suffering from the effects of war. Oscar Longmore who lived at the Post Office on Queen Street, Southwell was shot and wounded in September 1916 and after recovering at home was posted back to France in early 1917. He survived the war having spent several months as a prisoner of war in Germany. Richard Revill also survived the war returning to his home on Chatham Street in Southwell after being wounded in August 1915.

All who returned had to deal with tragedy and loss perhaps none more so than Alfred Townsend. Alfred survived but returned home to what must have been a very different World. He and his siblings had lost both their parents by 1910 and, at the time of the Census in 1911, Alfred was living with the Hazelwood family on Private Road Southwell whilst his siblings were boarding with other families across the town. Whilst Alfred survived the war it claimed the lives of both of his younger brothers, Walter and Robert and also Arthur the only son of the Hazelwood family.

In this the final Centenary year of World War One we remember them all.

For Club and Country Southwell City 1914-18

Having come across a Southwell team photo taken in 1911 I have spent some time researching the lives behind each of the names and the impact of World War One on the team. As the Centenary years of WW1 drawn to a close the outcome on the War devastated our team.

Of the players from the Southwell squad who won the Newark and District Challenge Cup in the 1910/11 season almost half would lose their lives in the conflict 1914-18, others came home wounded and traumatised.

I hope that the brief summary below will at least bring some of the names to life. As we see those named on posts around our town and gather at the Burgage next Sunday please pause to remember them all.

Two brothers Sam and Arthur Humberstone both played for the team and worked at Carey & Sons lace factory. Sam lived on Westgate with his wife and two young sons. The brothers enlisted with the 1/8th Sherwood Foresters and would leave Southwell with the Battalion in August 1914. Both were promoted to Corporal whist in France. Sam was killed in action in June 1915 his younger brother Arthur two years later.

Herbert Kirk, also an employee of Careys, the team’s striker of Burgage Lane enlisted in June 1915 and went to France in July 1916. In one season he scored 51 goals for Southwell City and went on to play professionally for Mansfield Mechanics. Herbert was killed in action in October 1916.

Edwin Gilbert of Dover Street was killed in action in March 1916 (the Gilbert family would also suffer the loss of Edwin’s younger brother Jack who, having survived 4 years on the battlefields of France, died of his wounds just a week before the end of the war in November 1918).

The team’s goalkeeper John Watson formally of Sheppards Row and employee of the Southwell Co-op store would also be killed in France in 1916 and is buried there along with many of his comrades.

Others from the team survived the war but would return home to a very different town. These included Alfred Townsend. Having lost both his parents prior to 1910 the war claimed the lives of both his younger brothers, Walter and Robert.

In this the final Centenary year of World War One we remember them all.

The full article will be in the next issue of the Bramley. It has also now been published on our website here.

 

Back in Time – City 1956/57

This is a great photo of the Southwell City team, taken shortly after the club reformed in 1955. This photograph was taken at Norwood Hall. At the time, City played home games on Crafts Fields in Southwell, which is now a housing estate.

Southwell City FC 1956/57

Back Row: David Hall, Terry Sandaver, Michael Cadman, Derek Whitton, Colin Heywood, Alan Shaw. Front Row: Joe Boucher, Tony Todd, Bill Wheat (Captain) Maurice Price, Barry Pailing

Two other great photos are featured below. The four players with the cup are Terry Sandaver, Michael Cadman, Tony Todd and Derek Whitton.

The second team photo, shown below, features the following players:

Back Row: (?), David Hall, Terry Sandaver, Michael Cadman, Derek Whitton, Colin Heywood, (?) Front Row: Billy Wheat (Captain), Joe Boucher, Tony Todd, McSloy, Sir William Starkey, Alan Fordyce, Maurice Price, Barry Pailing, Alan Shaw

Many thanks to Derek Whitton for allowing the club to publish these photos online.

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Back in Time – City 1922/23

Southwell City Football Club was first formed in 1893. This means that the club is now enjoying it’s 125th anniversary.

We are now looking for club photographs, through the ages, which we will publish on the club website in order to show the long history of this football club.

The image above is a great team photo, featuring the Southwell City team of 1922/23. Second from left is Samuel Booth, a coal merchant in Westgate. The man with the towel is Barney Johnson, landlord of the George and Dragon pub (now known as the The Bramley Apple Inn).

If you have an old photograph, negative or a digital copy of any Southwell City related photos, please contact us as we would love to show them on this website.

Photo Credit: Southwell Civic Society